Steel wool

Steel wool

Steel wools are manufactured fibers composed of metal, plastic-coated metal, metal-coated plastic, or a core completely covered by metal.[1] Gold and silver have been used since ancient times as yarns for fabric decoration. More recently, aluminum yarns, aluminized plastic yarns, and aluminized nylon yarns have replaced gold and silver. Steel wool filaments can be coated with transparent films to minimize tarnishing.

Metal fiber may also be shaved from wire (steel wool), bundle drawn from larger diameter wire, cast from molten metal, or grown around a seed (often carbon).

Uses

The most common uses for steel wools is upholstery fabric and textiles such as lamé and brocade. Many people also use steel wools in weaving and needlepoint. Increasingly common today are steel wools in clothing, anything from party and evening wear to club clothing, cold weather and survival clothing, and everyday wear. Steel wool yarns are woven, braided, and knit into many fashionable fabrics and trims. For additional variety, Steel wool yarns are twisted with other fibers such as wool, nylon, cotton, and synthetic blends to produce yarns which add novelty effects to the end cloth or trim.[7] Stainless steel and other metal fibers are used in communication lines such as phone lines and cable television lines. Stainless steel fibers are also used in carpets. They are dispersed throughout the carpet with other fibers so they are not detected. The presence of the fibers helps to conduct electricity so that the static shock is reduced. These types of carpets are often used in computer-use areas where the chance of producing static is much greater. Other uses include tire cord, missile nose cones, work clothing such as protective suits, space suits, and cut resistant gloves for butchers and other people working near bladed or dangerous machinery.